Honors Thesis Pathways

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What is an Honors Thesis Pathway?

Thesis pathways are structured, pre-organized thesis options that students can participate in to complete their thesis requirement.  Students will be paired with a faculty member who will serve as their thesis director.

The students that enroll in the Thesis Pathway will be part of a structured cohort course that will guide you through the thesis writing and defense process.

For more information please contact Barrettadvising@asu.edu or your Barrett Advisor.

HON PATHWAY COURSES

A HON Thesis Pathway is the ability to turn select Honors seminar courses (HON 394) into your thesis! Students have the choice of a non-thesis HON course or a two-semester (HON course and HON 493) Thesis Pathway option. Students enrolled in HON course in the Fall can expect to defend and submit their thesis in Spring.

Both HON course and the HON Thesis Pathway course options are open to all students who have successfully completed The Human Event or History of Ideas, regardless of the topic.

To get started simply choose a HON course listed below to sign-up for the Fall semester! As the class progresses during the semester you will have the option to join the Thesis Pathway for Spring.  It is important to be proactive in engaging the professor about the thesis opportunity and understanding what the expectations are.

The below options are available for the Fall 2022 semester.

HON 394: Birth of the Quantum

HON 394: Birth of the Quantum

M/W 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM

 

Are you a science major looking to do a non-lab-based thesis? This upper division honors seminar is designed for Barrett students interested in researching broad historical and philosophical aspects of quantum theory—all majors welcome.  Considered the most successful physical theory of all time, quantum physics forever changed the way we understand the universe and the matter contained within it. This course will introduce you to the main ideas of quantum theory and its historical development.

HON 394: Psychoanalytic Thought & Criticism

HON 394: Psychoanalytic Thought & Criticism

T/Th 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM

 

This course surveys significant concepts and historical developments in psychoanalysis during the 20th century, addressing major figures such as Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, Melanie Klein, and Jacques Lacan. Although the general orientation to the subject is theoretical, the primary purpose of this survey is to provide students with a psychoanalytic framework for the interpretation and criticism of contemporary cultural phenomena.

HON 394: The Global Cold War

HON 394: The Global Cold War

M/W 3:00 - 4:15 PM (ASU Sync)

 

This course will combine lecture and critical discussion to cover some of the more important events of the Cold War and expose students to the dynamics of political rhetoric, conflict, and the fight for freedom that marked the entire period. Covering almost half a century, the global divide that followed the devastation of World War II at once brought about conflict and tension but also opportunities for new leaders throughout the world.  In addition to an historical overview, we will cover some major theories that arose to challenge traditional international relations and read of the experiences of ordinary people from the 1940s until the 1980s.

HON 394: American Political Thought

HON 394: American Political Thought

M/W 3:00 - 4:15 PM

 

American Political Thought: Principles and Paradox In this course we will explore the key philosophical currents underlying American political thought and will consider how this tradition has informed and been shaped by the historical conflicts that have defined American political life. What are the assumptions about power, self-government, and equality that have shaped the development of American political institutions and practices? Is there a distinctively American identity and how has it responded to various demands for inclusion and reform? Over the course of the semester, we will use a combination of philosophical texts, speeches, historical documents, and fiction to examine such questions and to situate current political debates within the tradition of American political thought.

HON 380 (97801): Aesthetics and Society

HON 380 (97801): Aesthetics and Society

Dr. Christiane Fontinha de Alcantara

T/Th 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM

The politics of human beauty in the 21st century: The nature of beauty has challenged thinkers from ancient to contemporary times. If in the past philosophers believed physical appearance revealed inner qualities, in contemporary times scholars believe that beauty is historically and culturally determined whereas evolutionary scientists view beauty as an evolutionary trait that was selected for optimal mating. This course will discuss historical perspectives on human beauty that help us understand the contemporary obsession with beauty practices. From the individual to the social, we will critically examine beauty as social and cultural capital, and as a mechanism to filter social exclusion and inclusion and to activate strategies of sexism and racism, alongside discourses of femininity, masculinity and ideal bodies. Through the analysis of print and visual texts, we aim at answering the following questions: Is beauty a synonym for physical attractiveness? Is outer beauty a direct reflection of inner beauty (moral goodness and purity)? Is beauty a static concept defined by nature or is it a socio-cultural construct? How does beauty affect human relations? Why are certain places and body parts sites of beauty discourses

T.W. LEWIS CENTER THESIS PATHWAYS

Start on your Honors Thesis in Fall with the T.W. Lewis Center for Personal Development. This two-semester course will meet your Honors Thesis Requirement and provide you with a level of structured support from Lewis Center faculty. Your thesis director will be the instructor of the course you enroll in, and support will be provided (if needed) for finding your second committee member. Students will be expected to have their thesis completed by the Spring. These sections start Fall 2022, and will be completed Spring 2023.

 

To enroll in one of the below Thesis Pathways, please email the professor teaching the pathway.

Leadership, Diversity, & Education

Leadership, Diversity, & Education

Professor:  Janelle Kappes

Time:  Wednesday, 4:30 - 7:15 PM

Location:  ASU Sync

 

Using an interdisciplinary approach to leadership, diversity, and equity, the topics of this thesis pathway will address the intersections of ability, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, language, and social class, and draw on interdisciplinary research in education and leadership to develop transformative approaches and solutions that lead to higher educational achievement for all students. Students may choose to focus on one, two, or all three areas of the topic in their thesis project. For example, students may analyze the structure of the American education system and examine historical, social, political, economic policies that promote educational equity and inclusion. Additionally, students may consider the role that education plays in fostering justice and equity in a democratic society, or construct a program or series related to education and leadership

Imagining the Good Life

Imagining the Good Life

Professor:  Jessica Sturgess

Time:  Monday, 4:30 - 7:15 PM

Location:  ASU Sync

 

This seminar is for students who wish to think in a humanistic manner about the pursuit of the good life, broadly understood. Projects related to studies of culture, political theory, or psychology around questions of success and happiness are particularly welcome. These projects will do deep theoretical exploration to provide a philosophically sophisticated interpretation of these phenomena to better understand them in our contemporary moment. Students will work independently or in small groups to refine research skills and design thesis projects on a range of topics.

Science and Society

Science and Society

Professor:  Thomas Martin

Time:  Thursday, 4:30 - 7:15 PM

Location:  ASU Sync

 

In an advanced industrial economy, science and technology impact our lives in increasingly intricate ways. Theses in this domain will focus on how a specific scientific/technical issue affects human beings at both the individual and social levels. There is substantial leeway in how this topic is interpreted, and it is meant to be as inclusive as possible. Though the thesis itself does not need to be scientifically technical, there must nevertheless be some substantive scientific/technological issue at its foundation. Both STEM and non-STEM students are enrolled, as the course relies on student perspectives from a wide range of background.

Engaging, Creating, Leading

Engaging, Creating, Leading

Professor: Katherine O’Flaherty

Time:  Tuesday, 4:30 - 7:15 PM

Location:  Downtown - MERCBB 104

 

This seminar is designed for students doing research on projects related to any aspect of human society and culture who seek to engage communities in and with their work. Research will be grounded in humanities methodologies which provide tools for shaping and reflecting the complexity of lived experience and provide powerful avenues for analysis, critique, creativity, and reflection. This class also provides opportunities for thoughtful advancement and innovation in a range of fields, especially for students in pre-professional fields. Students in health related fields, media, public policy, and arts are especially encouraged to apply. Students will work independently or in small groups to refine research skills, craft research questions, and design thesis projects.

HUMANITIES LAB

The Humanities Lab offers learning experiences in which interdisciplinary faculty teams partner with students from a variety of academic and cultural backgrounds to investigate some of the world’s most complex social challenges. Enrolled students collaborate in teams, engage with community partners, design impact outcomes that create new ways of knowing, doing and being and share those outcomes in public forums which they choose.

Honors students now have the opportunity to enroll in select Humanities Labs to create their thesis project through a two-semester Lab experience. Students will partner with Lab faculty and receive structured support as they complete the thesis project on a topic related to their Lab’s social challenge. All Humanities Lab courses offer automatic honors credit and you have the option to take the course without doing a thesis.

To get started, enroll in one of the below Labs, and email the instructors prior to the first day of classes to indicate you would like to work with them on an honors thesis.

In the class search, search by the title of the course to see the different sections offered.


Avanzando Education Pathways

Avanzando Education Pathways

Professor: Dr. Mara Lopez and Dr. Dulce Estevez

Time: Thursday, 4:50 - 7:35 PM

Location: Tempe - ISTB7409

 

This course, Avanzando - Moving Forward, in partnership with the diverse community of Maryvale, aims to establish clear educational opportunities and career development support for Phoenix youth. Through an interdisciplinary and intersectional investigation into educational practices (formal and informal), student teams will produce research-based, actionable responses to educational disparities and community challenges related to conflicting cultural norms and values. With faculty mentorship, students will identify cultural and systemic barriers that inhibit student educational empowerment and produce research-based, hands-on solutions that incorporate the nuances of a humanistic perspective and consider relevant historical, cultural, and linguistic contexts of Maryvale.

Justice Through School Gardens

Justice Through School Gardens

Professor: Dr. Joan McGregor

Time: Monday/Wednesday, 1:30 - 2:45 PM

Location: Tempe - ISTB7409

 

This course on school gardens will provide students with interdisciplinary approaches on how to make our food system more sustainable and just by connecting students to local elementary schools. Through school gardens, Lab students will support the elementary curriculum, pursuing questions such as: how can school gardens be a place of learning about nutrition and the environment? Why do our current food systems fail to provide access to proper nutrition for so many children? How can schools be agents of change for the food system? Lab students will use their experiences to create a model for state policy on gardens in school. As part of our intellectual scaffolding for understanding the importance of school gardens at the intersection of food justice, environmental justice, and climate justice, students will investigate the problems with the modern food system and how it exacerbates inequalities, for example, with health outcomes and children's performance in school. In this Lab, we will look at food and food systems to get at some of the fundamental justice questions raised and then how school gardens might be part of the solution to those inequities.

Humanizing Digital Culture

Humanizing Digital Culture

Professor: Dr. Elizabeth Grumbach and Dr. Jason Bronowitz

Location: iCourse (Session A)

 

Lab participants consider how digital culture is (re)shaping human identity, and how humankind attempts to humanize digital culture. An Art-Science-Tech lens offers interdisciplinary inquiry and creative platforms to engage with cutting edge initiatives in humanizing digital culture (HDC) through digital identity enterprises, XR and net-native art experiences, experimental publishing, and other innovations.

 

Other Unique Thesis Pathway Opportunities

Other Unique Thesis Pathway Opportunities

In addition to the opportunities mentioned above, the following are other unique opportunities you can explore. These sections started Fall 2021, and will be completed Spring 2022.

 

■ Founders Lab

■ Founders Lab

Do you want the invaluable experience of an honors thesis based on applying the principles of entrepreneurship by starting you very own venture?

This fall we invite you to join a unique team-based, experiential Barrett honors thesis/creative project designed to empower honors students to ‘find their inner entrepreneur’ and launch a new business. Supported by a community, participants will take an opportunity and design and apply unique marketing and sales strategies, as well as business & financial models.

Approximately 100 students, in teams of 3, will design and launch a new user-centric business, culminating in a spring demo day/thesis defense.  

You do not need to be currently cultivating your own idea or start up to participate!

All majors welcome! Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors.

Program Logistics

  • This program is only for Barrett, The Honors College (from any major or campus) and will result in an honors thesis project for submission by April 2023.
  • Thesis credits will be taken: Fall 2022- WPC 492 and Spring 2023- WPC 493 for a total of 6 honors thesis credits.
  • There will be required group meetings each semester with a schedule determined by the thesis director, Jared Byrne.
  • 2nd committee members will be provided
  • Students will submit their prospectus during the Fall 2022 semester.
  • Full commitment and participation is expected for both Fall and Spring of the 2022-2023 academic year.

For more information, and to apply for participation, Click Here!

Questions? Contact Jared Byrne

■ InnovationSpace

■ InnovationSpace

The InnovationSpace program provides students with a unique opportunity to develop and prototype solutions to real world challenges. Using the Integrated Innovation model, teams of top students from across the university research, develop, prototype and refine product concepts. InnovationSpace is a class so please expect to have to register for a 5 credit hour class to participate in one of the projects.  Barrett Honors students have the option to turn this two semester project into a thesis.  

This project is open to all majors, and your thesis committee is provided for you.

For more information on the projects:  https://design.asu.edu/innovationspace

Click here to start the application